Jul 20, 2018  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog

EIU Course Descriptions


Generally, courses numbered 1000-1999 are freshman courses; 2000-2999, sophomore courses; 3000-3999, junior courses; 4000-4999, senior courses; and 5000-6999, graduate courses. However, if prerequisites are met, students may enroll according to the following schedule:

 

Class   Courses Numbered
Freshman   1000   2000 a a
Sophomore   1000   2000 3000 a
Junior   1000   2000 3000 4000
Senior   1000   2000 3000 4000/5000-5499b
Graduate       4750-4999c 5000-6999  
  • a – Courses numbered 3000-4999 in chemistry, foreign languages, mathematics, and military science may be taken by students who have prerequisites and permission of the department chairperson.
  • b – Courses numbered 5000-5499 may be taken by students who have a 2.75 GPA and permission of instructor and Dean of the Graduate School.
  • c– Courses numbered 4750-4999 are open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Numbers in parentheses following the course title indicate the number of class hours per week, laboratory or studio hours per week, and credit hours. For example (3-0-3) indicates three hours of classroom work each week, no laboratory hours, and three semester hours credit. Students enrolled in courses whose meeting times are noted as “arranged” (Arr.) should contact the instructor by the beginning of the semester. Unless indicated as below, courses are offered every term. Offering times indicated are: Su – Summer Term; F – Fall Semester; S - Spring Semester. Writing-Intensive courses are designated “WI.”

Prerequisites for courses are printed immediately following the course description. Prerequisites are predicated upon the assumption that students require certain knowledge and/or skills gained in one or more previous courses. Of particular concern in this regard are courses numbered 3000 or above, especially those required in majors and minors. Such courses often connect to a series of prerequisites, and, in many cases, only the highest ranking prerequisite in the series is listed with the course description. Students must be aware that the listed prerequisite may itself have one or more prerequisites. It is the student’s responsibility to consult the catalog course descriptions to be sure that all prerequisites in a series have been met.

A student may not enroll in a course serving as a prerequisite for another course he or she has already completed. (This rule does not apply to students who do not earn grades of C or better in ENG 1001G, ENG 1002G, and/or CMN 1310G or in accepted substitutions.) A student may not enroll in a lower level course which substantially duplicates a higher level course already completed. Should a student violate this prescription, he/she may not receive credit for the course toward graduation.

 

Chemistry & Biochemistry (CHM)

   •  CHM 3780 - Instrumental Analysis.
   •  CHM 3910 - Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics.
   •  CHM 3915 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory.
   •  CHM 3920 - Quantum Chemistry.
   •  CHM 3940 - Computer Programming in Chemistry.
   •  CHM 4000 - Undergraduate Seminar.
   •  CHM 4001 - Undergraduate Seminar.
   •  CHM 44001 - Undergraduate Research I.
   •  CHM 44002 - Undergraduate Research II.
   •  CHM 44003 - Undergraduate Research III.
   •  CHM 44004 - Undergraduate Research IV.
   •  CHM 44101 - Independent Study I.
   •  CHM 44102 - Independent Study II.
   •  CHM 44103 - Independent Study III.
   •  CHM 44104 - Independent Study IV.
   •  CHM 44441 - Honors Independent Study I.
   •  CHM 44442 - Honors Independent Study II.
   •  CHM 44443 - Honors Independent Study III.
   •  CHM 44444 - Honors Independent Study IV.
   •  CHM 45551 - Honors Research I.
   •  CHM 45552 - Honors Research II.
   •  CHM 45553 - Honors Research III.
   •  CHM 4644 - Honors Thesis.
   •  CHM 4666 - Honors Seminar.
   •  CHM 4750 - Environmental Chemistry.
   •  CHM 4770 - Molecular Spectroscopy.
   •  CHM 4790 - Medicinal Chemistry.
   •  CHM 4800 - Selected Topics in Chemistry.
   •  CHM 4860 - Advanced Biochemistry.
   •  CHM 4900 - Inorganic Chemistry II.
   •  CHM 4915 - Advanced Laboratory.

Clinical Laboratory Science (CLS)

   •  CLS 4000 - Clinical Chemistry I.
   •  CLS 4005 - Clinical Chemistry II.
   •  CLS 4010 - Clinical Hematology.
   •  CLS 4020 - Clinical Hemostasis.
   •  CLS 4030 - Clinical Immunohematology.
   •  CLS 4040 - Clinical Immunology.
   •  CLS 4050 - Clinical Microbiology I.
   •  CLS 4055 - Clinical Microbiology II.
   •  CLS 4060 - Special Topics in Clinical Laboratory Science.
   •  CLS 4070 - Clinical Management and Education.

College of Sciences (CSC)

   •  CSC 3100 - Global Threats and Problems.

Communication Disorders and Sciences (CDS)

   •  CDS 2000 - Introduction to Communication Disorders & Sciences.
   •  CDS 2100 - Phonetics and Phonological Development.
   •  CDS 2200 - Language Acquisition.
   •  CDS 2500 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech, Language, Swallowing, and Hearing Mechanism.
   •  CDS 2800 - Speech and Hearing Science.
   •  CDS 3100 - Phonological Assessment and Remediation.
   •  CDS 3200 - Developmental Language Disorders.
   •  CDS 3500 - Neurological/Embryological Aspects of Communication.
   •  CDS 3700 - Diagnosis and Treatment of Communication Disorders.
   •  CDS 3900 - Introduction to Clinical Techniques in Communication Disorders and Sciences.
   •  CDS 4300 - Introduction to Audiology.
   •  CDS 4350 - Aural Rehabilitation.
   •  CDS 4600 - Seminar in Communication Disorders and Sciences.
   •  CDS 4644 - Honors Thesis.
   •  CDS 4666 - Honors Seminar.
   •  CDS 4690 - Honors Seminar in Communication Disorders and Sciences.
   •  CDS 4810 - Sign Language and Deaf Culture for the Speech-Language-Pathologist.
   •  CDS 4815 - Augmentative and Alternative Communication.
   •  CDS 4850 - Independent Study.
   •  CDS 4900 - Clinical Practice.

Communication Studies (CMN)

   •  CMN 1310G - Introduction to Speech Communication.
   •  CMN 1390G - Introduction to Speech Communication, Honors.
   •  CMN 1500 - Television & Video Development.
   •  CMN 2010 - Introduction to Communication Theories.
   •  CMN 2040 - Argumentation and Critical Thinking.
   •  CMN 23751 - Practical Experience I.
   •  CMN 23752 - Practical Experience II.
   •  CMN 23753 - Practical Experience III.
   •  CMN 23754 - Practical Experience IV.
   •  CMN 2500 - Production I.
   •  CMN 2520 - Introduction to Mass Communication.
   •  CMN 2525 - Studio Production.
   •  CMN 2550 - Audio Production & Voice Work I.
   •  CMN 2630 - Introduction to Interpersonal Communication.
   •  CMN 2650 - Introduction to Organizational Communication.
   •  CMN 2920 - Introduction to Public Relations.
   •  CMN 2990 - Introduction to Rhetorical Studies.
   •  CMN 3000 - Communication Research Methods.
   •  CMN 3020 - Public Relations Research, Evaluation, and Measurement.
   •  CMN 3030 - Promotional Communication.
   •  CMN 3050(2575) - Production II.
   •  CMN 3100 - Persuasion.
   •  CMN 3210 - Rhetorics of Protest, Movement, and Resistance.
   •  CMN 3220 - Rhetoric of Race.
   •  CMN 3230 - Advanced Public Speaking.
   •  CMN 3240 - Religion in the American Public Sphere.
   •  CMN 3260 - Rhetoric of Class.
   •  CMN 3270 - Communication and Popular Culture.
   •  CMN 3300 - Interviewing.
   •  CMN 3470 - Small Group Communication.
   •  CMN 3520 - Audio Production & Voice Work II.
   •  CMN 3530 - Film Communication.
   •  CMN 3540 - Production III.
   •  CMN 3560 - International Communication.
   •  CMN 3570A - Topics in Media History I.
   •  CMN 3570B - Topics in Media History II.
   •  CMN 3570D - Topics in Media History III.
   •  CMN 3610 - Broadcast News.
 

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